Will I Ever Be the Same After Surviving Abuse?


Overcome Abused

overcomeabuse

Triggers. Flashbacks. Nightmares. Hyperventilating. Extreme Anxiety. PTSD. Avoiding places, situations, people. Sobbing. Becoming void of emotion. Depression. Fatigue. Sleeping too much or not sleeping enough. Self-doubt. Hyper vigilance. Eating disorders. Panic. Detachment. Suicidal thoughts/behavior. Anger. Hate. All of these are common effects of experiencing trauma. You are not alone in this. There isn’t “something wrong with you”. You are not broken. You CAN and WILL overcome these things. After all, you have already survived 100% of everything in your life so far. Chances are, you can survive this as well.

All of these things have weighed heavily on my mind over the long weekend. I was officially diagnosed with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) last Wednesday, so I’ve been trying to wrap my mind around it. The more I reflect on the symptoms that come from abuse, the more it breaks my heart that as abuse victims we have experienced enough pain…

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People and Flames


Famous Thinkers

Dreamspinner Extraordinaire

Eons ago, Owen-t nominated me for the3 Day Quote Challenge. Since I was caught up with the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, I only get to check gazillions of notifications recently.

I know most of you are not really fond of challenges, nominations and the like. So I’m including this one in one of my categories. Feel free to join the fun if you want.

From the brilliant mind of Eduardo Galeano:

6a00d8341c575d53ef0148c7f2992c970c Image source: Frontpage Mag

“Each person shines with his or her own light. No two flames are alike. There are big flames and little flames, flames of every color. Some people’s flames are so still they don’t even flicker in the wind, while others have wild flames that fill the air with sparks. Some foolish flames neither burn nor shed light, but others blaze with life so fiercely that you can’t look at them…

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Chronic stress (PTSD)


Chronic stress increases level of a protein that decreases availability of mood-regulating chemical

September 13, 2016 by Toni Baker

http://jagwire.augusta.edu/archives/37059

One-way chronic stress appears to cause depression is by increasing levels of a protein in the brain that decreases the availability of an important chemical that regulates our mood, scientists report.

They have found elevated levels of transglutaminase 2, or TG2, in the brains of mice experiencing chronic stress – an animal model of depression – as well as the prefrontal cortex of depressed people who committed suicide.

High TG2 levels in the mouse translated to atrophy of neurons, depression-like symptoms and reduced levels of TrkB, the receptor for brain derived neurotrophic factor, a brain-nourishing molecule that also aids connectivity, said Dr. Anilkumar Pillai, neuroscientist in the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.

When scientists overexpressed TrkB, it relieved the depression-like symptoms in their animal model. “If you don’t have enough BDNF, then all the serotonin in the world won’t help,” said Pillai, corresponding author of the study in the Nature Journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Likewise, when they directly reduced TG2 levels using a drug or a viral vector, more BDNF signaling occurred and depressive symptoms abated, said Pillai, who suspects that the protein may be a powerful new target in the fight against depression.

They found TG2 levels increased in their animal model following administration of stress hormones and after several weeks of actual stress that mimics the lives of chronically stressed individuals. Both produced classic depressive behavior and increased TG2 levels in the prefrontal cortex, a region involved in complex thoughts, decision-making as well as mood and personality expression.

Serotonin is a major neurotransmitter in the brain involved in many functions, including mood regulation. Serotonin levels in a depressed patient’s blood should be high because serotonin signaling in the brain is low, Pillai said. Blood levels can be used to help diagnose the condition that affects about 350 million people worldwide and is the leading cause of disability, according to the World Health Organization. Many cell types make serotonin. Interestingly, the vast majority of serotonin is made in the gut, but neurons do make some of their own, Pillai said.

Astrocytes make BDNF, whose levels are also low in depression. Although just how the two work together is an unfolding mystery. In this study, Pillai and his team further linked them by showing that treatment that increases serotonin availability – as most antidepressants do – also increased levels of the BDNF receptor thru the action of RAC1. TG2 converts serotonin to RAC1, a protein that helps rejuvenate the BDNF receptor, TrkB.

Now the MCG scientists have shown that in depression a healthy balance of all these is upset, as elevated TG2 makes less serotonin available, leaving insufficient levels to enable proper communication between neurons. The brain also is more vulnerable as the increased level of activated RAC1 is inexplicably degraded, which leads to less instead of more BDNF signaling.

“Increased amounts of TG2 will eventually lead to decreased levels of RAC1, and BDNF signaling is just not happening,” Pillai said.

Next steps include looking for other drugs that lower TG2 levels. For the study, researchers used cysteamine, whose clinical uses today include treatment of a rare genetic condition in which a buildup of crystals can cause kidney failure. Unfortunately, the drug creates an odor that has patients bathing multiple times daily. They also want to directly measure serotonin levels following treatment, although Pillai notes that increased BNDF signaling should be significant to alleviate symptoms.

The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Assistant Research Scientist Dr. Chirayu D. Pandya is the study’s first author.

Anilkumar Pillai Chirayu Pandya mcgfeed Medical College of GeorgiaNational Institutes of Health Psychiatry and Health Behavior

Nigri Draókos
Psicofilosofía Urbana (c)1980
Copyright 1980 JoeAbbis ICP

Various Quotes


Various Quotes:

“It is not about the female body, adorned and wear by amazing garments and makeups, is more like a humble innocent thunderstorm what really makes her attractive.”

“Eros is an addiction you can’t control; the power of Eros will corrode your mind with the sweet juicy smell of honey.”

“The eyes are literally the door to your soul, if you have anything to hide, it’s best to tear out your eyes or they will give you away.”

“Extremes are good, the middle is bad, either you’ll learn or get stuck.”

“Attitude, it will get you kill or it will save you.”

Nigri Draókos
Psicofilosofía Urbana (c)1980
Copyright 1980 JoeAbbis ICP

Algunas Citas


Algunas citas;

“No se trata de que el cuerpo femenino sea adornado y vestido de las prendas sorprendentes y maquillajes, es más como una tormenta, inocente, humilde lo que realmente la hace atractiva.”

“Eros es una adicción que no puedes controlar, el poder de Eros te corroe tu mente con el jugoso dulce aroma de la miel.”

“Los ojos son literalmente la puerta de su alma, si tienes algo que ocultar, lo mejor es arrancarte los ojos o se te descubrirá todo.”

“Los extremos son buenos, el medio es malo, aprendes o te atascas.”

“La actitud, le llevará a la muerte o te salvará.”

Nigri Draókos
Psicofilosofía Urbana (c)1980
Copyright 1980 JoeAbbis ICP